Agriculture Trade And The Environment The Dairy Sector by Darryl Jones

By Darryl Jones

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Extra resources for Agriculture Trade And The Environment The Dairy Sector (Agriculture, Trade and the Environment)

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Some caution is required in interpreting these trends, especially because of data deficiencies and the relatively short time period over which these observations have been made. 7. Dairy cow GHG emissions per unit of milk in selected countries, 1990-2001 Index of dairy GHG emissions per unit, 1990=100 1 110 100 United Kingdom New Zealand 90 USA France Netherlands 80 70 Canada 60 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 Note: 1. Each point represents the level of dairy cow GHG emissions per tonne of milk, with 1990 = 100.

Source: OECD Secretariat. 7). e. as the coefficient factors to calculate nitrogen manure production from dairy cows are based on live animals, with productivity improvements this implies less nitrogen emissions per unit volume of milk produced. The research literature also provides some evidence that dairy producers are improving their environmental performance through applying technologies and husbandry practices and systems that reduce emissions or the pollution risk. Some caution is required in interpreting these trends, especially because of data deficiencies and the relatively short time period over which these observations have been made.

X Trade in dairy products has increased at a faster rate than production, particularly during the last half of the 1990s. While only a small proportion of total world production is exported, exports are significant for some European and Oceania countries. This chapter provides a brief overview of the world dairy market, discussing the levels and trends in production, consumption and trade of milk and milk products. Since 1980, there has been a steady increase in world cow milk production, although production in some OECD countries has been constrained by quotas, with some significant increases in others.

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